Getting Married in Bali – You have to Know

Getting married in Bali is top consideration for couples looking for an exotic and romantic setting to exchange their vows. Being one of the world’s best island destinations to tie the knot, Bali has a collection of fine resorts that cater to couples looking for the best venue and dedicated chapel options to have their weddings.

Nevertheless, all the arrangements and considerations leading up to the big day can be nerve-racking for both bride and groom-to-be. There are professional planners and wedding specialists that are ready to handle all the details for you, so you can enjoy your wedding day and honeymoon at ease. Here I am want to give you a little bit information about Getting Married in Bali.

 

Why get married in Bali?
Bali’s exotic appeal owes much to its unique and vibrant culture, as well as its natural beauty, from sweeping mountain panoramas with stretches of rice paddies, to exotic sea temples bordered by rolling surf. With such gorgeous backdrops, why not make it the setting for your most cherished day? And it is no secret that hotels and resorts in Bali make very good use of their locations, be it beachfront or the central highlands, with the most memorable setups on offer. Specially designed packages differ from one hotel to another, and different ways to celebrate also vary widely. Dedicated wedding venues include chapels and customizable outdoor venues with the most stunning backdrops. The weather in Bali, typified by sunny and tropical days, allows for great outdoor options as well, such as the seaside or a forested setting.

 

Best time to get married in Bali?
Unless you are planning for an indoor or ballroom ceremony that is virtually unaffected by the weather, you can consider the months between May and August, generally the drier season when your wedding ceremony can be most pleasant for and the bride or bridegroom, guests and the ensuing photos. It’s when humidity levels are low, the skies are bluer and breezes are cooler (temperatures range between 26-27 degrees Celsius). Morning weddings are usually around 10:00 to noon. For dramatic sunset wedding backdrops, arrange for shots between 18:15 and 18:45. Nevertheless, being in a monsoonal climate with somewhat unpredictable weather, rain is always a possibility. However, to some, rain can be considered a sign of good of luck and prosperity on your wedding day.

 

What to Expect to Pay?
With the abundance of wedding options and attractive packages provided by resorts in Bali, prices vary greatly. These many options are designed to suit all budget ranges, with tailored setups and details from catering, decor, live entertainment and inclusions such as honeymoon spa treatments and romantic dining offers. Their team of on site wedding specialists are ready to suggest and adjust specifically for you – from a mini and private wedding with non-staying guests at around only IDR 1,500,000 to a more extravagant five-star setup with all the tidings and services (sometimes with accommodation included) at USD 10,000.

Advertisements

Sanctuary of Grey Macaques – Monkey Forest in Ubud, Bali

Ubud Monkey Forest, also known as the Sacred Monkey Forest of Padangtegal, is one of Ubud’s most popular attractions; a natural forest sanctuary that is home to a horde of grey long-tailed macaques. The site is well-preserved thanks to a community-based management program. The forest is also conveniently positioned near Ubud Town Centre, and within easy walking distance from guesthouses and resorts along the main roads of Jalan Hanoman and the namesake Jalan Monkey Forest.

Besides watching playful monkeys in their natural habitat, swinging through canopies, lazing along pathways or feeding on bananas, the site offers cool walks along paved pathways through a leafy nutmeg forest. Beautiful ancient temples with guardian statues covered in moss also feature throughout the forest. Those staying outside of Ubud and coming for a day tour usually have the Ubud Monkey Forest as a must-visit, combined with sightseeing highlights at the Ubud Royal Palace and shopping sprees through the expansive Ubud Art Market, all only a 10-minute drive away.

What to See in Ubud Monkey Forest?
Deep inside the forest lies the 14th century Pura Dalem Agung Padangtegal. Another site of interest is the Pura Prajapati, which is dedicated to village funerals. Most mossy relics and statues are under dense foliage with little sunlight, giving these smaller sites their mysterious and ancient feel. Banyan tree roots hanging over shadowy dragon staircases offer exotic photo opportunities. You can also discover an ancient bathing temple, located northwest of the main Ubud Monkey Forest grounds, known as Pura Beji, accessible down a flight of stairs and next to a stream.

 

The Monkeys
Being a tourism attraction, the Ubud Monkey Forest is well-known for its conservation efforts. Research and studies are regularly carried out for observing the monkeys’ health, diet and breeding habits. Over a hundred macaques inhabit the forest, divided into four different known troops. While it is always tempting to touch or feed the monkeys, you are advised against it. They are wild animals. Another rule of thumb is to avoid wearing any loose jewellery or apparel – the macaques may easily snatch a necklace or bag for something interesting enough to eat.

 

Good to Know About Ubud Monkey Forest
Ubud Monkey Forest has local guides and staff ready to assist you during your visit. The Wenara Wana staff may also try in assisting you with retrieval of any ‘items’ stolen by monkeys. Guides are also a great source of information about the cultural and historical significance about the sites and temples within the sanctuary grounds. As with any holy site in Bali, women during their periods aren’t allowed to enter any of the temple grounds.

Opening Hours    : Mon – Sun 08:00 – 18:00
Location                : Monkey Forest, Padangtegal, Ubud
Public admission : IDR 40,000/adults
IDR 30,000/ kids.

THE BIGGEST KITE FESTIVAL IN BALI

Bali festivals and events are important features in the social landscape of the island, and also permanent fixtures in the lives of the Balinese. Some of these unique cultural festivals and events are determined by Balinese calendars from long ago, while others are highlighted schedules that take place on certain dates each year.  These festivals largely form part of Bali’s attractions and culture, showcasing the rich arts and cultural features that sets Bali apart from any other destination. The Provincial Government of Bali holds numerous festivals that pay tribute to this wealth, and the great thing is that you can match your visiting dates with these highlight events

The Bali Kites Festival is a kiting event that takes place annually, between July and August). It kicks off notably at the start of the windy season in Bali. The main festival takes place along the eastern coast of Padanggalak, just north of Sanur. This is usually held near the end of June and confirmed following favourable weather. Hundreds of competing kite troupes gather from all over the island to pilot their traditional kites. Oftentimes, alongside international teams with modern kites in various shapes and sizes.

The kite festival in Bali started off as a seasonal agrarian festival. It was held to thank the heavens for abundant crops and harvests. The festivals then became a competitive ground for communal ‘Banjar’ youth groups, who send their ‘Sekaa Layangan’ kite teams to participate and win prize money. A competition is also usually held for new creation kites. These may include detailed three-dimensional figures and unusual designs, ranging from Hindu gods, cars and motorbikes, to mascots and brand sponsors. A gamelan orchestra accompanies each troupe. This adds to the joyous spirit of the Bali Kites Festival and the dramatic take-offs.

The Balinese traditional kites are gigantic, measuring up to four metres in width and 10 metres in length. Some other versions, such as the ‘Janggan’  type have impressive flowing ribbon tails. Tails often reach 100 metres or more in length. Jointly built at the communal ‘Banjar’ village halls all over Bali, skilled youths, supervised by elders, craft bamboo frameworks for weeks up to the major event. Lightweight fabrics are selected according to an agreed-upon colour scheme. Some are fitted with intricately carved heads. The final results await transport usually by truck and requiring special escort along small Balinese roads – towards the Bali Kites Festival flying grounds on Padanggalak Beach.

The ‘Bebean’ type is the most common design with a traditional outline of a fish. This is the common giant kite of Bali that dominates the skies. The ‘Janggan’ somewhat resembles birds, with shorter and rounder wings. Their long flowing “Kedeber’ ribbon tails also often outshine the kite’s body once airborne. In each competition, the task of assembling and flying the entailing ‘Kedeber’ is major challenge for the piloting troupe. A troupe normally comprises a dozen or so boys and men. Categories to win include best launch,  best design and longest flight. Occasionally, the kites descend over nearby rice paddies. Team members must dash onto the fields to retrieve their painstakingly built kites.

The skies over Padanggalak are dominated by these flying giants during the Bali Kites Festival. Nevertheless, you’ll witness kite-filled skies on any given day between June and August  every year. Skies over Bali are just as elaborately decorated as any Balinese procession this windy time of the year. Some kites are even fitted with sound instruments in the form vibrating bows called ‘Guwang’. These generate a resonating hum that can be heard from far. Enjoy Bali’s windy season sights and sounds!

 

 

TRY A NEW WATERSPORT IN BALI – SEA WALKER

These best activities in Bali are for those wanting to take a break from Bali’s shopping, dining and nightlife. It’s easy to get absorbed into all the things that this island is best known for, but there’s a lot to discover than meets the eye. Why not enjoy a splashing day at the island’s premier water park, or head to the hills and race through jungles on all-terrain vehicles?

Along the coasts, Bali also has treasures to discover on the waves and under. Surfing is what the island became best known for, and there are magnificent reefs teeming with life beneath the surface. The best part about Bali is that it’s one of the places that you can enjoy as much or as little as you want, without breaking the bank. Here’s our compilation to help you get out and have fun with the most exciting things to do in Bali.

Bali Sea-walker is an underwater activity that offers everyone an opportunity to enjoy an underwater experience with the minimum of equipment. The ‘walks’ utilize a specially designed helmet that is connected to oxygen tanks aboard a boat, providing participants with a constant flow of air to breathe underwater. Participants with prescription lenses need not take their glasses off to enjoy the activity due to the convenient helmets, and will remain dry from the chin up throughout the tour. Depths are approximately seven metres, where you will soon be able to observe colourful schools of fish, coral reefs and marine life. Bali Sea-walker operates at two main sites, off Sanur and Tanjung Benoa.

 

Highlights and Features of Bali Seawalker

The underwater tours take approximately 30 minutes, and the standard package usually includes hotel transfers for a minimum of two persons, refreshments and soft drinks, Seawalker gear, Japanese standard safety equipment, certified and experienced guides and insurance coverage.

The Sea-walker tours can be enjoyed by all ages from 10 years up. No diving experience or swimming skills are necessary. The tour is an eye-opener for those with no prior underwater experience, and it also provides participants the opportunity to interact with marine life.

It is an extraordinary approach that makes it easy to discover the underwater realm without having to deal with bulky diving gear. Guides provide full instructions before setting out to sea and taking the plunge.

Upon arriving at the sea walking spot, participants lower themselves down a side ladder and guides help put on the special shoulder padding and helmets. Soon after reaching the bottom, beautiful reef formations and varieties of tropical fish become visible. On certain occasions, large swarms of fish gather and even obstruct views due to their large numbers.

Good to Know about Bali Seawalker

No prior diving training or experience is required to participate in the sea walks. Many of Seawalker’s customers do not know how to swim, and most have their first experience in the ocean through the activity.

Participants of the sea-walker are recommended to bring their own swimsuit, sunscreen and underwater camera although underwater pictures are taken by the guides and can be purchased separately. Guests with heart or lung problems, those who are on medication, with asthma or other respiratory ailments, and pregnant women are not allowed to participate.

MORE INFORMATION:
Location: Sekar Menuh Building, Jalan Bypass Ngurah Rai No.5, Padanggalak, Sanur.
Prices : 375.000/person

Characteristic Balinese People, You Must know!

1. INTRODUCTION

Much of the outside world’s image of Indonesia is based on Bali, which is a prime tourist destination. However, Balinese culture is very different from the national mainstream, especially in its unique Hindu-animist religion. Inscriptions from 9th-10th centuries AD record the emergence of Balinese kingdoms that would later fall under Javanese domination. In the 16th century, King Batu Renggong of Gelgel unified Bali. The social and religious order that was established at that time continues to the present day.

2 . LOCATION

The island of Bali covers 2,243 square miles (5,808 square kilometers), an area slightly larger than the state of Delaware. Its population of 4million (2015). The island has an unbroken east–west chain of volcanoes and a narrow plain along the north coast. A series of valleys stretches south to the Indian Ocean.

3. LANGUAGE

The Balinese speak an Austronesian language whose closest relative is Sasak, the language of Lombok. Although now they increasingly use Latin letters, their traditional script was a distinct version of the Javanese alphabet.

The Balinese language has a system of politeness levels. The highest language is spoken only to Brahmana priests. middle or refined level is used when addressing people of high social status, older people, or one’s parents. The low or ordinary level serves for talking to those one considers of equal or inferior status. The Balinese also have a custom of assigning names according to birth order. For example, in Sudra families:
the firstborn child will receive the name “Wayan”
the second, “Made”
the third, “Nyoman”
the fourth, “Ketut”
and the fifth, “Putu”

4 . FOLKLORE

Leak are witches who are ordinary people by day but who are believed to leave their bodies at night. They take many different shapes (a monkey, a bird, a disembodied head, a ghostly light). They can cause disease or crop failure, or poison food. Amulets (charms) or Mantra (incantations) acquired from a priest or shaman can combat them.

5. RELIGION

Unlike the vast majority of Indonesians, the Balinese are not Muslim but Hindu (except for Christian and Buddhist minorities). Their Hinduism combines the Indian model with elements of native religion. The object of their religious practices is to maintain a balance between good and evil forces. Thus, Balinese make offerings to both gods and demons. They recognize a wide range of supernatural beings, including demons, ancestral spirits, and divinities such as the sun god Surya and the rice goddess Dewi Sri.

6.  MAJOR HOLIDAYS

Each of the thousands of temples on Bali celebrates its own Odalan (festival) usually lasting three days.

Galungan is a ten-day festival celebrated throughout the island. The gods and deified ancestors are invited to descend from heaven. Penjor tall, decorated bamboo poles are raised in front of each house and temple to represent fertility.

Eka Dasa Rudra is a holiday that occurs only once every 100 years. (The last time was in 1979.) It entails several weeks of ceremonies at Bali’s supreme temple, Besakih, on the slopes of Mount Agung.  The aim is to purify the entire universe by exorcising a chaotic element called Rudra .

7 . RITES OF PASSAGE

Depending on a family’s social status, as many as thirteen life-cycle rituals (Manusa Yadnya) may be performed. Events that are marked include the sixth month of pregnancy, birth, the falling off of the umbilical cord, the twelfth, forty-second, and one-hundred-fifth days after birth, the two-hundred-tenth day after birth, marking the child’s first “touching of the earth”, the emergence of the first adult tooth; the loss of the last baby tooth, the onset of puberty (first menstruation for girls), tooth-filing, marriage, and purification for study.

When they are ready to become adults, tooth-filing is performed on teenagers. It is believed to purge them of their “animal nature,” which is symbolized by the fang-like upper canine teeth.

Full adulthood, in the sense of full social responsibility, begins only with marriage. Weddings involve roughly three stages:
1. a ceremony in which the boy’s family asks the girl’s family for the hand of the girl.
2. the wedding ceremony itself
3. a formal visit by the new couple and the groom’s family to the bride’s family so that the bride may “ask leave” of her own ancestors.

Cremation is performed after death. However, a proper ceremony is extremely expensive. The family may take months or even years to accumulate the necessary funds. In the meantime they find a temporary storage or burial spot for the body. For the ceremony itself, the body is carried to the cremation field in a portable tower. The tower is rotated at each crossroads so that the deceased’s spirit cannot find its way back home to haunt the living. The dead cannot become deified ancestors until they have been properly cremated.

8 .RELATIONSHIPS

Balinese society is divided into four castes, or social classes: Brahmana, Satria, Wesia, and Sudra. When starting a conversation with a person of high social status, one bows. With children and people lower on the social ladder, one simply nods. One takes advice, instruction, or criticism by saying Nggih (a respectful “yes”) or with silence.

9. LIVING CONDITIONS

The Balinese family lives in a walled compound (Uma) inhabited by a group of brothers and their respective families. Within it, grouped around a central courtyard, are separate buildings for cooking, storing rice, keeping pigs, and sleeping. Each compound has a shrine (Sanggah). A thatched pavilion (Bale) serves for meetings and ceremonies. A walled-in pavilion (Bale-Daja) stores family heirlooms. Rivers serve for toilet and bathing functions.

10. FAMILY LIFE

Marriage between members of different castes is now common. Most newlywed couples remain in the groom’s compound. Households include married sons and their families until they are able to establish their own households. At least one son must stay behind to care for the parents in their old age.

Although menstruating women are considered ritually impure and may not enter temples, discrimination against women is not pronounced. However, within the family there is a clear division of labor. Women buy and sell in the markets, cook, wash, care for the pigs, and prepare offerings. Men work for the Banjar (community organization), prepare spices and meat for feasts, play in orchestras, attend cock-fight, and drink together in the early evenings. Women join the caste of their husbands.

11. CLOTHING

In work outside the home, especially for office and store jobs, Balinese wear Western-style clothes. Around the house, men wear shorts and a tank top, or Sarong (a skirt like garment). Men’s traditional clothing includes a Kemben Sarung (a type of Sarong) of Endek (a locally made cloth) or Batik cloth.

Women wear a Kemben Sarong, usually of mass-produced batik cloth. For temple ceremonies, women wear a belt wrapped around the body up to the armpits, with a Kebaya over it. Most women now wear their hair too short for traditional hairstyles, so they wear wigs to go with ritual dress.

12. FOOD

The Balinese eat their meals individually, quickly, and at no fixed times, snacking very frequently. Everyday food consists of rice and vegetable side dishes, sometimes with a bit of chicken, fish, tofu (bean curd), or Tempe (fermented bean curd), and seasoned with chili sauce made fresh daily. Many dishes with standard spice mixture composed of sea salt, pepper, chili, garlic, shrimp paste, ginger, and other ingredients.

For ceremonial feasts, men prepare Ebat, chopped pig or turtle meat mixed with spices, grated coconut, and slices of turtle cartilage or unripe mango. Other Balinese specialties are Babi Guling (stuffed pig turned over a fire), and Ayam Betutu (stuffed chicken wrapped in banana leaves and cooked in ashes).

5 The Best Things to Do in Bali When it Rains

Bali is enjoyably sunny during most of the dry season. However, occasional downpours are common at any time of the year. Even when the skies turn dark grey and the roads are wet from drizzly to heavy rains, Bali still offers numerous activity options. Discover Balinese cuisine, special spices and ingredients, and how to prepare them through fun cooking classes or spa treatment. You can also take your family or friends to see various shows that merge traditional tales with high-tech sound and lighting. The weather may turn dull, but with many choices, your holiday in Bali will never be.

1. Have a Pampering Spa’s Treatment
The Balinese believe that the body is a sacred temple for the soul. Visit any Bali spa for an experience that brings peace to the spirit, calm to the mind and vitality to the body. A Balinese spa treatment is also a journey itself, to discover a heritage of wellbeing through techniques and special ingredients. Bali spas offer many traditional treatments which use local herbs and healing oils. Balinese massage oil is usually made from extracts of ginger (Jahe), frangipani (Jepun), sandalwood (Cendana) and coconut (Kelapa). Each of these ingredients have their own uses and special properties. Here they are 10 best luxury spa’s in Bali:
1. Thermes Marins & Spa On the Rocks
2. Riverside Spa at Maya
3. Royal Kirana Spa
4. Fivelements, Puri Ahimsa
5. Lembah Spa
6. Karma Spa
7. Mango Tree Spa by L’Occitane
8. Soori Spa
9. The Spa at the Bulgari Resort Bali
10. Prana Spa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Jewellery Courses and Silver Workshops
Bali’s clans of gold and silversmiths have been creating intricate objects for temple heirlooms, rituals and fine jewellery for centuries. Their designs continuously evolve, as do the handed-down crafting techniques. The island’s gold and silver communities are mostly located in the villages of the Gianyar regency, particularly Celuk, Mas and Ubud. Some have showrooms alongside workshops that welcome you to observe the creation process, and some go further by handing you the silver beads, tweezers and wireworks to learn from the local artists in creating your own piece to take home. Here are some of Bali’s top jewellery crafting centres where you can go on a brief workshop and showroom tour and even pick up the art of silver making, from granulation to soldering, and down to the final polish. There are 5 Great Silver Workshops in Bali:
1. Prapen
2. Chez Monique
3. Studio Perak ( Silver Studio)
4. WS Art Studio
5. John Hardy Workshop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Indoor Fun and Games
Bali’s collection of trick art galleries and interactive 3D museums not only offer great activities for families during rainy days on the island, but they also serve as wonderful alternatives to the beach and malls. Step inside these wondrous art spaces and you can find immersive murals masterfully crafted to create stunning three-dimensional illusions. Some are truly life-size and hyper realistic, which allow lots of experimentation with your creative poses all to make that one of a kind group shot.

From parodies of famous celebrities, such as scenes from the White House, or classical paintings gone wild, blockbuster movie characters, fairy tale and magical themes, to the most current pop culture references, these galleries will offer you hours of fun discovery. Most of them have a helpful team of guides who are more than happy to show you some creative pose tips and ideas, and they can also take that perfectly framed shot for you, so no one has to miss out on the fun. 3 best Museum in Bali:
1. Dream Museum Zone (DMZ) Bali
2. Upside Down World Bali
3. I AM Bali 3D Interactive Art Museum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Bali Cooking Classes
Balinese cooking classes have become increasingly popular as the island’s tropical cuisine gains wider appeal thanks to its rich ingredients, changeable spiciness levels for every palate, and fun preparation techniques. Courses are often packaged with early morning fish and farm market tours that let you discover the variety of fresh tropical sea creatures, meats, poultry, aromatic exotic spices and organically grown tropical fruits before your hands-on experience in recreating age-old traditional dishes – from satay varieties, fresh salad mixes with spicy sambal sauces and dips, to a range of healthy desserts. Here are Bali’s top spots that provide fun cooking courses for a different culinary experience, and from where you can bring home some exciting Balinese recipes and newly acquired skills. Here they are 10 Best Places to learn Balinese Cuisine:
1. Iboe Soelastri’s Cooking Class
2. Bumbu Bali
3. Bali Asli
4. Casa Luna
5. Balinese Cooking Class at The Amala
6. Anika Cooking Class
7. Paon Bali Cooking Class
8. Jambangan Bali Cooking Class
9. Lobong Culinary Experience Bali
10. Warung Eny

5. Spectacular Theatre Show in Bali
Devdan Show is a 90-minute theatrical show that is great for the whole family, which you can enjoy four times a week at Bali’s Nusa Dua Theatre near the bay of Nusa Dua and the Bali Collection. The premise of the story is a boy and girl who decide to break away from their mundane tour group, only to stumble upon an enchanted treasure chest filled with various cultural objects from the different islands in the Indonesian archipelago, hence the shows subtitle, ‘Treasure of the Archipelago’.

The two child actors also serve as narrators; each ‘discovery’ of an item from their treasure chest bringing on a corresponding scene onto the stage, with acrobatics on the floor and aerial silk dancers suspended from the ceiling. Each episode is brought to life with detailed props, lively choreography, pyrotechnics, laser and light displays, and music that alternates from traditional orchestral sounds to modern upbeat soundtracks.

The objects range from anything from a Balinese udeng headwear, a Javanese angklung bamboo instrument, tribal weaponry from Kalimantan, to a koteka gourd worn by men in Papua. Each basically serves as lead-ins to a tour of the Indonesian archipelago. Both entertaining and educational, it’s a great intro into the cultural diversity of Indonesia, with the acts and dances serving as eye candy.

From gigantic traditional puppets, ornate Sumatran houses and life-size Joglo wooden houses from Java, together with special effects such as a rotating stage, fireballs, artificial rain, illusions and lighting, all complement the dances. Kudos goes to the dance troupe and main cast, who keep it upbeat with their moves throughout the one-and-a-half hour show.

An aerial play finale features the two main characters, Deva and Dhana who give the show its name, gracefully flying through the air in dizzying heights, suspended on lengths of silk. At the end of the show, you can have your photos taken with the cast and crew all in full costumes, right outside the auditorium.

There are several seating arrangements with a VIP seats comprising plush leather sofas providing the sweetest viewing angle (IDR 1,560,000 per person). The three other categories range between IDR 520,000 and 1,105,000 with children admitted half the rates. Bookings can be made three months in advance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOP 3 BEST RAFTING, U HAVE TO TRY!

All your imagination about Bali doesn’t have to be stuck to the beach, because another adventure awaits you in this paradise.

Different degrees of rough water around the island challenge you to conquer the fear and feel the thrill. Test your adrenaline to conquer the river rapids with Bali Rafting Adventure. There are 3 rivers available for river rafting in Bali, There are: Melangit, Telaga Waja, and Ayung Rivers, make it possible for you to enjoy different difficulty levels of white water rafting Bali, either you are a solo adrenaline junkie, or simply enjoy the leisure with friends, or even bring along your children and family.

Different degrees of rough water around the island challenge you to conquer the fear and feel the thrill. Test your adrenaline to conquer the river rapids with Bali Rafting Adventure. There are 3 rivers available for river rafting in Bali, There are: Melangit, Telaga Waja, and Ayung Rivers, make it possible for you to enjoy the different of difficulty levels of white water rafting Bali, either you are a solo adrenaline junkie, or simply enjoy the leisure with friends, or even brings along your children and family.

MELANGIT RIVER

Melangit river is one of the beautiful river used for rafting in bali, precisely located in Klungkung area around 1:45 minutes from Kuta. This river is suitable for you who want to do rafting in the middle level, with a route of about 8 km.
Melangit river is one of the beautiful river used for rafting in bali, precisely located in Klungkung area around 1:45 minutes from Kuta. This river is suitable for you who want to do rafting in the medium level, with a route of about 8 km.

You need take about 2 hours to complete the trips, along the river you will find many rapids that will stimulate your adrenaline and views of an unspoiled tropical forests, wild animals on the trees and beautiful natural stone structure in most of the river wall. You need take about 2 hours to complete the trips, along the river you will find many rapids that will stimulate your adrenaline and views of an unspoiled tropical forests, wild animals on the trees and beautiful natural stone structure in most of the river wall.

AYUNG RIVER

Ayung River in Ubud is one of the most challenging white water rafting sites in Bali, has a stable water condition in all year round, although during the dry season you can still get a fun rafting here. Ayung Rafting is suitable for you if you are looking for a adrenaline rush in outdoor activity. It has medium track with a rapid level of 2-3 for most of the parts. With 12 kilometers distance of rafting track, it can be quite challenging to conquer the fun filled rapids within 2 hours. Ayung River in Ubud is one of the most challenging white water rafting sites in Bali, has a stable water condition in all year round, although during the dry season you can still get a fun rafting here. Ayung Rafting is suitable for you if you are looking for a adrenaline rush in outdoor activity. It has medium track with a rapid level of 2-3 for most of the parts. With 12 kilometers distance of rafting track, it can be quite challenging to conquer the fun filled rapids within 2 hours.

Ayung Rafting Ubud is also known as one of the best white water rafting with spectacular view of unspoiled rainforest and wildlife (such as beautiful Blue Javan Kingfisher), including rice fields, magnificent (hidden) waterfall and amazing stone carving on some area of the river walls. With only 1.5 hours approximately from Kuta, you can enjoy this magnificent adventurous river in Ubud. Ayung Rafting Ubud is also known as one of the best white water rafting with spectacular view of unspoiled rainforest and wildlife (such as beautiful Blue Javan Kingfisher), including rice fields, magnificent (hidden) waterfall and amazing stone carving on some area of the river walls. With only 1.5 hours approximately from Kuta, you can enjoy this magnificent adventurous river in Ubud.

It is not recommended for small children and elderly due to the long stairways which require efforts and some strong legs to get to the starting point in the river from the lobby area, and vice verca. It is not recommended for small children and elderly due to the long stairways which require efforts and some strong legs to get to the starting point in the river from the lobby area, and vice verca.

 

TELAGA WAJA

Telaga waja river is one of the fantastic place for white water rafting in bali, it has the longest rafting track (+ 15 km) that we offering. The river is located in muncen karangasem area approximately 2 hours from Kuta.

Telaga waja river is one of the greatest place for white water rafting in bali, it has the longest rafting track (+ 15 km) that we offering. The river is located in muncen karangasem area approximately 2 hours from Kuta.

You need take about 2.5 hours to complete the trips. The river is beautiful, nice rocks, clean water, flows along the expanse of green fields, hills, valleys, cliffs and waterfall. You can enjoy the beautiful scenery along the river with the medium rapids which is it will be pumping adrenaline and test your physical strength, even at the finish point we will encounter rapids as high as 5 meters. You need take about 2.5 hours to complete the trips. The river is beautiful, nice rocks, clean water, flows along the expanse of green fields, hills, valleys, cliffs and waterfall. You can enjoy the beautiful scenery along the river with the medium rapids which is it will be pumping adrenaline and test your physical strength, even at the finish point we will encounter rapids as high as 5 meters.

Beji Guwang – Hidden Canyon Paradise in Bali

Beji Guwang Canyon is a river with a stone wall that is formed and patterned very wonderful because eroded by river water for hundreds of thousands years to create a masterpiece that makes everyone amazed.

Special of Beji Guwang is the main attraction of the hidden canyon Beji Guwang is rock cliff view which has about 20-30 meters, with streams of blue sky. There is a beautiful and fascinating place that local people often referred to as Beji Guwang Hidden Canyon Bali. Hidden Canyon is located in the guwang village then “beji” word means fountain which is purified by the locals. In addition there is a beautiful engraved rock wall there are also some other things that are not as beautiful as the cluster of rocks with clear water rippling and calm in some places so you can swim in it.

A quiet peaceful place makes this place very suitable for meditation or yoga because the nuances is supportive especially this place away from the crowds. Or it could be just a place to reflect or be a release the burg crowd.

How to get to Hidden Canyon Beji Guwang?

Beji Guwang Hidden canyon located in the village of Sukawati Guwang not far from Sukawati Art Market. From Jalan Raya Gawan it’s well signposted from the turnoff marked by a large stature of Visnu riding Garuda Drive. From Denpasar about 15-20 minutes to the east.

Prices:
Admission is 15,000 rupiah, and a group of about 30 local guides work on a rotation basis for tips. It was suggested to us that 50,000 rupiah for a trek to the first section only or for the full round trip, 100,000 to 150,000 rupiah depending on how many in your group, would be appropriate.

What wil you do?
You are going to get wet, so dress appropriately. The area is considered sacred by the locals, shorts and T-shirt (or boardies and a rashie) and more acceptable than swimmers. Local guides suggest going barefoot but unless you have soles of leather, i recommend you for wearing trekking sandals or water shoes. Take plenty of water and a drybag for electronics, you can leave unnecessary bags at the ticket counter.

Beginning at the Pura Dalem in Guwang village, a steep cement staircase takes you about 12 metres down to the river where on the opposite bank, the small Beij Guwang Temple overlooks a sacred spring and bathing area. Here a sign says “fish therapy” and if you dangle your feet, fish may nibble your toes, but the water was too fast flowing on our visit for any hungry fish to be hanging around. During dry season the water is crystal clear and you can see the rocks and fish.

The trail follows the river upstream for about 1.5 kilometres, often against a fast flowing current. In some sections the water is ankle deep, others it’s over most people’s heads, although you can avoid these parts by clambering over boulders. Although it seemingly gets little sun, the water temperature is surprisingly warm, which suggests that at some point along its course, thermal springs may warm it up.

Traversing the chasm, you’ll be awed by its sheer natural beauty: craggy walls of rock, pitted and worn over millennia, tower 20 to 30 metres, narrowing in sections so the overhanging trees and vines almost entwine to form a canopy. A filtered sheaf of rays illuminates the moss-covered escarpment. Veins of red and white mineral deposits mix with the dark rock. The river changes course three times with three distinct narrow canyons, while other sections of the river are much wider.

Climbing, balancing, jumping and clinging to the walls to pull yourself up onto rocks requires a reasonable level of fitness and fearlessness. There are some demanding white knuckle moments, however the guides are very experienced and helpful and will dictate every footstep and handhold. They’ll also carry your bags to avoid them getting wet, and pull you over the tricky bits.

The final section where a confluence branches off to become the Bengbengan River, the continuation of the Oos River almost narrowed to a trickle on visit, and was more like a jungle trek, than river, but still very appealing. A short climb up some stairs takes you to a very narrow path (25cm wide) along a water channel perched high above the surrounding fields.

All up the trek will take you around 3hours, stopping for photos and a bit of a swim. Cleanish toilets are near the ticket booth, and a small selection of warungs offers snack and cold drinks.

 

5 Awesome Beaches in Nusa Peninda, You have to Go!

Nusa Penida is the biggest of the three Nusa Islands just off from mainland Bali. If you are going on a trip to Bali and you want a slice of real island life then please visit Nusa Penida. There are so many awesome things to do on Nusa Penida.

  • How to get to Nusa Penida?

From Nusa Lembongan, the boat to Nusa Penida took only 20 minutes and cost $10/person.

 

Here they are 5 awesome beaches in Nusa Peninda:

1. Angel’s Billabong
To get here is a pain in the ass, but after you suffered for at least an hour on your motorbike you found a magical spot. This natural pool seems the perfect spot to swim but be careful.

 

 

 

2. Kelingking Beach
This is the perfect spot to fully grasp the shape of the dinosaur or Kelingking. If you look at the picture below you can see the head with the mouth wide open on the left, while the tail seemingly wraps around to the right! It is a shore-break beach and the waves were barreling and dumping. This isn’t a beach for novice swimmers and the sets came out of nowhere.

 

3. Peguyungan Waterfall
It is a largely undeveloped island with only one resort having been built there. This waterfall will take your breath away. Literally. If you don’t like stairs or you are incapacitated in some way then this might not be the best adventure for you. There is a lot of walking and the terrain is quite challenging, including a 200 meter cliff of very steep stairs to scale.

 

4. Manta Bay
For many scuba divers this is a wet dream, but here on the island you don’t even need to gear up to get up close and personal with these gentle giants. There are many snorkel trips that can be booked around the island. Sights of manta rays are common and there is even a place called Manta Point. Spotting manta rays is not guaranteed!

 

5. Broken Beach/ Pasih Uug Beach
Pasih: Beach, Uug : Broken.
Local people called this beach is Pasih Uug and foreigner called Broken Beach. Panorama on that beach is very beautiful and quiet. There are reach of cliffs 50-200 meters high. Cliff circular shape and the middle forming holes like caves or tunnels sea.

 

 

 

Authentic Luwak Coffee – Produce from Animal Feces

Have you been to Indonesia and tried Luwak Coffee?              Who would think to (or even want to) collect and roast beans out of animal feces?

Well, Luwak coffee is a great coffees from Indonesia are hard to find. Unique characteristics resulting from the unique natural fermentation and harvesting techniques profoundly impact the flavor of every bean.  Luwak is the local name of the Asian palm civet in Sumatra. The civet eats the coffee cherries, the cherries go through the digestive track and fermentation occurs, and then they pass through the intestines and eventually pooped out. The coffee cherries are then picked out from poop aka poop coffee.

  • Where Does Luwak Coffee Originate?

Luwak coffee came about in the 18th century in the Dutch East Indie islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia. Now a days it’s mainly produced on the Indonesian islands of Sumatra, Java, Bali, and Sulawesi. The Philippines, East Timor, and Vietnam are also making similar versions of poop coffee.

  • Where Can You Get Luwak Coffee?

The best way to purchase authentic Luwak coffee is to go to Indonesia and make a vacation out of it. It’s one of the tastiest things to do in Bali. Learn about the coffee’s process, sample a cup of poop coffee, and then buy some fresh Indonesian coffee to bring home with you. If you can’t swing an Indonesian vacation there are many websites selling the coffee or some specialty coffee shops may carry Luwak Coffee from Bali or other regions.

  • How Much Does Luwak Coffee Cost?

Luwak coffee is one of the most expensive coffees in the world with a retail price as high as $700 per kilo/$300+ per pound. However, farmed Luwak coffee (low grade) can be purchased in Indonesia at large grocery stores for about $100 kilo. There are Luwak coffee roasters in Bali that sell the coffee buy the cup so you can sample it. A cup sells for over $5 a cup in Indonesia.

  • What Does Luwak Taste Like?

The thought of an animal eating the coffee cherry, pooping it out, cleaning the coffee bean, and roasting it may sound a bit strange. What on earth could it taste like? The result of all this work is a very flavorful almost fruity coffee that has very little bitterness. During the digestive process the beans altered and it yields a much less bitter cup.

 

  • Why Is Luwak coffee The Most Expensive Coffee In The World?

Luwak coffee is the most expensive coffee in the world due to its quality and rarity. Along with being simply outstanding in flavour, the coffee is produced in incredibly small batches each year. In fact, some years the civets are only able to collectively produce around 500kg in an entire year. This is why the price is not only high, but also varies significantly from one year to the next.

%d bloggers like this: